Worship?

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Freedom, by Eddie James, was a song we sang in worship the other day.

Maybe I am getting old, but recently I am finding a hollowness in some songs that have a focus on personal pronouns. Too many me/we/I’s.

Don’t get me wrong. I thoroughly enjoyed the song, clapping my hands, tapping my foot, and was taken up in the spirit of the song, but my question is, what was the spirit of the song? Where was the ‘worship’?

What does worship mean? I heard someone say worship is to ascribe worth. According to Merriam Webster it is:
– the act of showing respect and love for a god…
– excessive admiration for someone.

According to Mounce’s dictionary it is the verb hāwâ, which means to bow down. An action that can be directed to person, human or God. It could simply be a greeting, but can be submission or adoration. Mounce wrote, “It is the external action of an internal attitude.” 1

The lyrics are below

I wanna clap a little louder than before
I wanna sing a little louder higher than before
I wanna jump higher than before
I wanna shout a little louder than before

Freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom
Freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom

I wanna clap a little louder than before
I wanna sing a little louder
I wanna spin wilder than before
I wanna shout louder

Songs like Freedom inspire me, get my engine revved up, but not much more than that. Other songs that have words of adoration, to He who is worthy, naturally bring me to a place of worship, or ascribing worth to the King of Kings. The songs that have words of worth toward the Lord of the universe motivate me to do something. Worship, an external action of an internal attitude. Standing, raise my hands or sitting with my head bowed, I am worshiping the One True God.

Next time you are worshiping, consider the words. Are they pointing out what you are doing or what He is doing? Is the song about what you are capable of with the help of God, or is it about what God is capable of? Is it about you, or is it about Him?

In a world flooded with ‘selfies’, the number of likes in a Facebook post, or how many views you had in a Youtube video, it is not surprising to have our worship songs reflect that aspect of our culture. If you take a moment to consider some of the lyrics of your favorite worship songs, you might be surprised how many have lyrics that focus on you, your relationship with Him, what he does for you, and what you are able to do with His help.

It is not about God’s plan in your life, but your life in God’s plan.

 

Sources:
1. Mounce, William D. Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2006. Print.

 

 

Creative Commons License
Worship? by James Glazier is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://www.dev.christianapologetics.blog.

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